Being a left brain type of person, I always struggle with the more touchy feely or intangible aspects of life.  Topics like the law of attraction or self-help or some of the personal growth stuff doesn’t always make sense to me but yet I know that keeping a positive mindset & envisioning a certain outcome are powerful things to practice.  For example, I think the book,” Think & Grow Rich”  by Napoleon Hill is a great book and although written decades ago, its principles still make a lot of sense today.

One of my goals for 2011 is to embrace one or two things that are outside my comfort zone.  So I picked personal growth/prosperity thinking as one of the two uncomfortable things I would work on this year.  I started listening to Randy Gage, who is a well known speaker who focuses on prosperity & ridding people of self-limiting beliefs.  I picked Randy because he lives in South Florida and I’ve heard him speak many times.  He’s a bit controversial & unorthodox in his approach & I happen to  like that because controversy always challenges your thinking which I think is good.

So like many speakers today, Randy has a You Tube channel where he shares his ideas, his rants & beliefs on prosperity.  His latest video gave me a lot to think about & I thought the idea applied to those leading & managing teams in corporate America today. Randy starts out the video by asking a powerful question: 

                         ” What would you do  if you knew you could not fail?

Interesting question, right?  But even more interesting are the possibilities that it offers if you apply it in a work setting.  One of the things that I see happening a lot in the corporate world is that people play small.  Everyone plays it safe because there’s so much fear of failing or looking bad or not making your target to get that bonus at the end of the year.  When I talk to companies & ask about what they are doing to innovate, many times even those ideas are rooted in safety.  One of the key reasons I think this happens is that leaders in organizations today are afraid to fail & they bleed that fear into their teams in subtle ways. 

 Time and time again, I have seen team members, those on the front lines, come up with great ideas.  When they try pitching the idea to their bosses,  the little “yea-but”  beasty rears his ugly head & squashes the idea.   Everyone who has worked in corporate is familiar with the “yea-but” beasty.  As soon as the beasty hears of an idea that’s outside of the norm, that is even slightly risky, he quickly invades the body of one of the decision makers and the conversation goes something like this: ” YEA, Sally, that’s a great idea BUT what’s the ROI on that?” or ” YEA, Bob, that’s a great idea BUT where are you going to get the money to fund it?” or my personal favorite “YEA, Nick, that’s a great idea BUT we don’t have any time to work on that right now?”  As if there was a “good time” to experiment & try out new ideas. The beasty wins again & the company misses out on a great opportunity to explore something that might lead to a new profitable product, new revenue stream, a new & more efficient process.

The “Yea-But” beasty works on our inherent discomfort to try new things because we are afraid to fail and corporate entities suffer from that as well except they make up good excuses to cover it up.    These days, I think the beasty is working full time on keeping leaders from recognizing the amazing talent that is sitting right under their nose in their Gen Y staff.  As I travel internationally to speak on the topic of Gen Yers & leadership, I hear the beasty all the time.  Leaders still believe that the Gen Yers will ultimately succumb to the way corporations have been managed since the 20th Century.  My response to that is simple “  Why would we want that”?  Anyone who has worked in corporate knows that there are a lot of things that could use a little fixing, a little overhaul, a little 21st Century upgrade.  So why don’t we merge the unique talents that Millennials bring to the workplace with our corporate experience & brainpower to create something better?  That could be risky & most of all it would require some work.  I can hear the beasty now…

But what about if we took a baby step every day to remove failure from the equation?  What if, like Randy Gage says, we carried out our leadership responsibilities as if we couldn’t fail?  What if we set a goal to experiment with one new idea or concept this year?  Imagine the boost of confidence you’d give your team?  The creative juices would wake up & the possibilities to develop a new product line, a new revenue stream, a new software tool could make all the difference to your bottom line.  But you’ll never know as long as the beasty is allowed to flourish.

When I struggled to understand & accept Millennials in my team years ago, the beasty was in full force & I, too, held on to the leadership principles that I had used for years.  At first, the beasty was winning big time but then slowly, with every uncomfortable baby step I took,  I got stronger & I fought the beasty back.  It was a great feeling to remove failure from my leadership equation & forge ahead with new ideas & experiments that produced bottom line results.   I was able to conquer the beasty and so can you.

So how about it?  What will you do today to fight the “Yea But” Beasty?  What will you do this week to remove failure from the equation?  What can you do if you knew you could not fail?  All it takes is a baby step…